The Myeloma Center is Teaming Up with the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society to Light the Night

We are proud to be supporting the 2016 Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) Light the Night Event! Because of the commitment of organizations like LLS to fund innovative research projects and connect patients with supportive services, we have made great progress in the fight against multiple myeloma. Learn more about our research and join our team!

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Sophisticated Testing Approaches Better Equip Physicians to Identify Myeloma Risks

Dr. Adriana Rossi talks with Healio about how primary care physicians and kidney specialists are becoming better at detecting an abnormal protein in the blood that's closely linked with myeloma. See what she has to say about how this leads to decreased suffering through earlier detection and intervention.

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Changing the Cancer Conversation

In the June issue of Delta Sky Magazine, Dr. Ruben Niesvizky weighs in on the latest progress in multiple myeloma treatment.

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2016 American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Presentation

June 6, 2016: The Weill Cornell Medicine team presented data at the 2016 American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting about a new technology to accurately and cost-effectively identify high risk myeloma. Matching the level of disease aggressiveness with specific treatments is tied to better outcomes. Learn more about this new tool and what this means for myeloma patients.

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Myeloma Center Awarded Prestigious LLS Translational Research Grant

The Myeloma Center in collaboration with Weill Cornell's Monical Guzman, PhD have received a prestigious translational research grant from the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS) to study the genesis of secondary malignancies in Multiple Myeloma.

Multiple Myeloma is characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of malignant plasma cells. The introduction of novel agents has resulted in improvement in survival. However, long term use of these agents may lead to the development of second primary malignancies (SPM).

The grant will allow the researchers to examine factors that contribute to the development of secondary malignancies and identify early changes that could be used as predictors of the risk for SPMs."